Fit Parents decide what is in the ‘best interests’ of their Children.

Family Law Reform Rally - 2016“What a Child Lacks”

“Changing a child last name (away from the father’s) is an act of venom”
“Changing a child last name (away from the father’s) is an act of venom”

— July 8, 2015

In its 1979 parental rights decision Parham v. J.R., the United States Supreme Court declared, “The law’s concept of the family rests on the presumption that parents possess what a child lacks in maturity, experience, and capacity for judgment required for making life’s difficult decisions.”Unfortunately, a bill recently passed by the New Jersey legislature completely throws out this presumption.

Assembly bill 3435 (A3435), “The Boys and Girls Clubs Keystone Law,” adds to New Jersey law that “when a minor believes that he or she is in need of behavioral health care services for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disorders, the minor’s consent to treatment…shall be valid and binding as if the minor had achieved the age of majority.”

This is scary enough if it puts a 16- or 17-year-old in the position to make such a serious and difficult health decision. But under this irresponsible bill, a child of any age could give legally binding consent for such treatments. There is no requirement for parental consent or even notification – for any child!

Of course, when we learned of A3435 we urged New Jersey supporters to call for its defeat and, more recently, for Governor Christie to veto it. So far, he has not done so.

Sadly, this bill reflects the growing dangerous trend of cutting parents out of the lives of their children. The new “wisdom” seems to hold that children are best left up to government experts or, barring that, their own devices.

It is the same argument used by the internationalists who push for the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). They argue for children’s rights to make their own decisions and not be “burdened” by the superior wisdom and experience of their parents.

But that isn’t really the way life works. At some point, that decision is going to be made by an adult, whether it is the parent or an agent of the state.

The Parham Court recognized that dichotomy. “Simply because the decision of a parent is not agreeable to a child, or because it involves risks, does not automatically transfer the power to make that decision from parents to some agency or officer of the state,” Chief Justice Warren Burger wrote for the Court. “Most children, even in adolescence, simply are not able to make sound judgments concerning many decisions, including their need for medical care or treatment. Parents can and must make those judgments” (emphasis added).

The internationalists recognize the dichotomy, too – and simply hope the rest of us don’t notice. In speaking of the CRC’s “best interest of the child” provision, international legal scholar and CRC advocate Geraldine Van Bueren writes, Best interests provides decision and policy makers with the authority to substitute their own decisions for either the child’s or the parents’, providing it is based on considerations of the best interest of the child.”

So if the parents and the child disagree in court, the judge gets to make the final call – not the child. What’s more, under the “best interest” principle, the judge still gets to make the call even if the parent and child agree with each other, but happen to both disagree with the state.

In neither system, then, does the child get to make his own decisions. He lacks the mental and emotional capacity to do so. In the traditional American system, the parents are the safeguard to fill that lack and protect their child. In the new internationalist norm, the State is responsible to second-guess the child “for his own good.”

A3435 claims to let the child stand or fall completely on his own. But at some point, unless we protect the traditional role of parents, it will be an agent of the State who ultimately gets to decide. We agree with Chief Justice Burger: “Parents can and must make those judgments.”Parental RightsAction Items

If you live in New Jersey, please take a moment to read our action alert here andcall on Governor Christie to veto this dangerous legislation.

And wherever you live, plan now to participate in National Parental Rights Week beginning July 20. To take part, plan with your family or friends how you can fill up one petition sheet (just 16 signatures!) of new supporters of the Parental Rights effort. Will you host a car wash? A barbecue? Or maybe just go door-to-door? Maybe you can reach out to folks at church, or sign up other parents of your child’s summer sports team.

However you choose to join in, know that standing together we can protect children – like those in New Jersey – by empowering parents to make those hard decisions with them and on their behalf.

Parents, not bureaucrats, will best decide what is right for their child.

Thank you for standing with us in this all-important battle!

Sincerely,

Michael Ramey
Director of Communications & ResearchState of Florida Parental Rights

"The liberty of parents to direct the upbringing, education, and care of their children..." In the 1925 decision of Pierce v. Society of Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a compulsory attendance act that required all parents to send their students to public schools, instead of private or religious schools. The court concluded that the act was unconstitutional because it "unreasonably interferes with the liberty of parents and guardians to direct the upbringing and education of children under their control." "...is a fundamental right."
“The liberty of parents to direct the upbringing, education, and care of their children…”
In the 1925 decision of Pierce v. Society of Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a compulsory attendance act that required all parents to send their students to public schools, instead of private or religious schools. The court concluded that the act was unconstitutional because it “unreasonably interferes with the liberty of parents and guardians to direct the upbringing and education of children under their control.”
“…is a fundamental right.”

That when a Child is born, both biological Parents have a right to know.Family Law Reform - 2016

A Child has a right to both Parents in their lives.

Facebook.com/StandupforZoraya
Facebook.com/StandupforZoraya

Fit Parents decide what is in the ‘best interests’ of their Children.No Test of Parenting FITNESS - 2015

Good, average, and poor Parents are Fit and Equal Parents.

That you and your spouse have a right to be presumed Fit and Equal Parents (equal in terms of both physical and legal custody).

If anyone (a spouse, relative, social services) wishes to challenge these rights, you have:
1) The right to counsel.
2) The right to be presumed a fit Parent, innocent, and deserving of an equal relationship with your kids.
3) The right to protection of a criminal jury. The “state” needs to prove you were a demonstrated serious and intentional threat to your Child’s safety and that you acted with mal-intent towards your Children.
Supported by: http://www.AKidsRight.Org 

The WordPress.com Blog

Looking for summer reading suggestions? Or perhaps winter reading suggestions, should your hemisphere be the Southern one? Look no further than these three authors who — like you — make their online home at WordPress.com.

Claire Fuller

Claire Fuller‘s debut novel, Our Endless Numbered Days, has been called “impossible to put down” by Amy Gentry at the Chicago Tribune.

PreviewClaire began writing at age 40, after co-leading a marketing agency for many years. The book has been shortlisted for the Desmond Elliott Prize, which is awarded annually to a first novel written in English and published in the United Kingdom.

Claire is a prolific blogger who likes to share her flash fiction and offer writing advice. Why not pick up a copy of Our Endless Numbered Days and then see if your location is on Claire’s upcoming events list?

Here’s a synopsis

View original post 427 more words

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Fit Parents decide what is in the ‘best interests’ of their Children.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s